The Hidden Ways

In The Hidden Ways, Alistair Moffat traverses the lost paths of Scotland. Down Roman roads tramped by armies, warpaths and pilgrim routes, drove roads and rail roads, turnpikes and sea roads, he traces the arteries through which our nation’s lifeblood has flowed in a bid to understand how our history has left its mark upon our landscape.

Moffat’s travels along the hidden ways reveal not only the searing beauty and magic of the Scottish landscape, but open up a different sort of history, a new way of understanding our past by walking in the footsteps of our ancestors. In retracing the forgotten paths, he charts a powerful, surprising and moving history of Scotland through the unremembered lives who have moved through it.


Citizen Clem

**WINNER OF THE ORWELL PRIZE FOR POLITICAL WRITING**
**WINNER OF THE ELIZABETH LONGFORD PRIZE FOR HISTORICAL BIOGRAPHY**
*Book of the year: The Times, Sunday Times, New Statesman, Spectator, Evening Standard*
‘Outstanding . . . We still live in the society that was shaped by Clement Attlee’ Robert Harris, Sunday Times
‘The best book in the field of British politics‘ Philip Collins, The Times
‘Easily the best single-volume, cradle-to-grave life of Clement Attlee yet written’ Andrew Roberts

Clement Attlee was the Labour prime minister who presided over Britain’s radical postwar government, delivering the end of the Empire in India, the foundation of the NHS and Britain’s place in NATO. Called ‘a sheep in sheep’s clothing’, his reputation has long been that of an unassuming character in the shadow of Churchill. But as John Bew’s revelatory biography shows, Attlee was not only a hero of his age, but an emblem of it; and his life tells the story of how Britain changed over the twentieth century.


RAF 100 Technical Inovations Manual

On 1 April 2018 the RAF celebrates its centenary, marking 100 years since its creation in 1918 out of the merger of the Royal Flying Corps and Royal Naval Air Service. The RAF has always been at the forefront of technology, both as an innovator and as a user of innovations. To celebrate the RAF’s first 100 years, Jonathan Falconer showcases a top 100 technical innovations that have been used and/or devised by the Service over the past century, ranging from heated flying suits to radar; and from panel fasteners to the VTOL Harrier.


Autumn by Ali Smith

SHORTLISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE 2017

SUNDAY TIMES TOP TEN BESTSELLER

‘In a country apparently divided against itself, a writer such as Smith is more valuable than a whole parliament of politicians’ Financial Times

‘Undoubtedly Smith at her best. Puckish, yet elegant; angry, but comforting’ The Times

‘A beautiful, poignant symphony of memories, dreams and transient realities… The first post-Brexit novel’ Guardian

A breathtakingly inventive new novel from the Man Booker-shortlisted and Baileys Prize-winning author of How to be both

Daniel is a century old. Elisabeth, born in 1984, has her eye on the future. The United Kingdom is in pieces, divided by a historic once-in-a-generation summer.

Love is won, love is lost. Hope is hand in hand with hopelessness. The seasons roll round, as ever . . .


Lincoln in the Bardo

WINNER OF THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE 2017
A NO. 1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER
LONGLISTED FOR THE GORDON BURN PRIZE 2017

‘It would be an understatement to call this novel an extraordinary tour de forceSunday Times

The extraordinary first novel by the bestselling, Folio Prize-winning, National Book Award-shortlisted George Saunders, about Abraham Lincoln and the death of his eleven year old son, Willie, at the dawn of the Civil War

The American Civil War rages while President Lincoln’s beloved eleven-year-old son lies gravely ill. In a matter of days, Willie dies and is laid to rest in a Georgetown cemetery. Newspapers report that a grief-stricken Lincoln returns to the crypt several times alone to hold his boy’s body.

From this seed of historical truth, George Saunders spins an unforgettable story of familial love and loss that breaks free of realism, entering a thrilling, supernatural domain both hilarious and terrifying. Willie Lincoln finds himself trapped in a transitional realm – called, in Tibetan tradition, the bardo – and as ghosts mingle, squabble, gripe and commiserate, and stony tendrils creep towards the boy, a monumental struggle erupts over young Willie’s soul.


Artists: Their Lives and works

A stunning exploration of over 80 famous artists and their fascinating lives, from Leonardo da Vinci to Frida Kahlo.

Artists: Their Lives and Works tells the inspiring stories behind the world’s most famous masterpieces and their creators, including their influences, development, friendships, loves, and rivalries. Discover the often tumultuous lives of iconic artists including Raphael, Hogarth, van Gogh, O’Keeffe, Magritte, Warhol, and Kiefer.

Featuring a foreword by Andrew Graham-Dixon, Artists: Their Lives and Works is the ideal gift for art lovers old and young, and a uniquely fascinating look at the lives of these creators.


Wounds by Fergal Keane

A family story of blood and memory and the haunting power of the past.

A SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER

After nearly three decades reporting conflict from all over the world for the BBC, Fergal Keane has gone home to Ireland to tell a story that lies at the root of his fascination with war. It is a family story of war and love, and how the ghosts of the past return to shape the present.

Wounds is a powerful memoir about Irish people who found themselves caught up in the revolution that followed the 1916 Rising, and in the pitiless violence of civil war in north Kerry after the British left in 1922.

It is the story of Keane?s grandmother Hannah Purtill, her brother Mick and his friend Con Brosnan, and how they and their neighbours took up guns to fight the British Empire and create an independent Ireland. And it is the story of another Irishman, Tobias O?Sullivan, who fought against them as a policeman because he believed it was his duty to uphold the law of his country.


Robert Harris: Munich

FROM THE BESTSELLING AUTHOR OF FATHERLAND, CONCLAVE AND AN OFFICER AND A SPY.

September 1938

Hitler is determined to start a war.

Chamberlain is desperate to preserve the peace.

The issue is to be decided in a city that will forever afterwards be notorious for what takes place there.

Munich.

As Chamberlain?s plane judders over the Channel and the F?hrer?s train steams relentlessly south from Berlin, two young men travel with secrets of their own.

Hugh Legat is one of Chamberlain?s private secretaries; Paul Hartmann a German diplomat and member of the anti-Hitler resistance. Great friends at Oxford before Hitler came to power, they haven?t seen one another since they were last in Munich six years earlier. Now, as the future of Europe hangs in the balance, their paths are destined to cross again.

When the stakes are this high, who are you willing to betray? Your friends, your family, your country or your conscience?